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Day: September 18, 2019

2 Feedwater Tank Design Flaws

2 Feedwater Tank Design Flaws

To ensure your boiler is operating with the highest efficiency, you will need a boiler water treatment plan. This program can’t be established without understanding feedwater setups, and a key factor in understanding them is the impact of deaerator systems. Through these pressurized vessels, a process both preheats and removes the oxygen from the water, limiting corrosion and other detrimental activities to boiler performance. The feedwater tanks heat and store the water, which can be problematic as these operate at atmospheric pressure and don’t contain a deaerating section. A feedwater tank needs to be designed so that it reduces oxygen scavenging and reduces thermal shock. Here are two primary design issues that can occur in a feedwater tank.

1. Poorly Heated Feedwater

The boiled feedwater needs to be heated before it enters the boiler in order to prevent thermal shock. Heating also removes oxygen from the water. Usually, a steam sparger is inside the tank which heats it through steam from the boiler. If you increase the temperature and reduce the oxygen, you reduce the oxygen scavenger requirements as well as the sulfite level. Having an adequate heating supply is the first step in making sure your feedwater is being thoroughly heated.

2. Wrong Cold Water Design

There is a lot of oxygen in the cold water that enters the feedwater tank, and how the make up is fed and where it in the tank it is fed can impact how easy it is for oxygen to dissolve. The make up should be fed between 3-6 inches below the water line, and through a sparger slowly and continuously. Cold water is more dense than heated, and it can sink to the bottom of the tank and head more quickly into the boiler.

Keeping your boiler system in good working condition starts with the way your feedwater tank is designed. Look for ways to keep the water evenly heated and slowly to protect the integrity of the system.…

3 Tips for Cutting Down Waste in Manufacturing Costs

3 Tips for Cutting Down Waste in Manufacturing Costs

When conducting a manufacturing process, cutting costs in one area of the process can mean huge changes in your profit margin. Here are three tips for cutting down on waste in manufacturing costs to become a more profitable business.

Keep Track of the Little Things

One of the best ways for you to cut down on waste is by keeping track of small, disposable products that your company uses a lot of in the manufacturing process. Whether it’s boxes of disposable gloves or a special type of o ring that is essential for your end product, effectively using these items can actually make a big difference in the long run in your overhead cost.

Optimize Efficiency

Another way to decrease overhead costs of manufacturing is by optimizing the efficiency of your production staff. A great way to accomplish this is by consulting with an operations engineer as to where you can cut down production time. Being willing to reverse-engineer your processes or even rearrange your shop floor to become more time-efficient can increase your productivity and decrease your cost waste.

Negotiate Better Supply Costs

When it comes to production costs, sometimes where you need to look is in your accounts payable. By negotiating better prices from suppliers and being willing to trade companies when necessary, you can make your overall cost decrease without reneging on quality. Many suppliers are willing to cut deals in exchange for bulk orders and contracts for future supply, which can end up helping your company come out on top.

As far as overhead costs are concerned, you have quite a few options for cutting down on waste in both material and economic indications. Being willing to change how your company works in the manufacturing process, inventory organization, and supplier negotiations can make a big difference on your bottom line.…